German Plum Cake – Pflaumenkuchen
Growing up, we often had plums in the house, mainly because one of my dad’s favorite German cakes is plum cake, also know as Zwetchgenkuchen (Schwetz-gun-coo-ken) or Pflaumenkuchen (Flau-men-coo-ken). Kuchen (Coo-ken) means cake in German.
German Plum Cake – Pflaumenkuchen
Growing up, we often had plums in the house, mainly because one of my dad’s favorite German cakes is plum cake, also know as Zwetchgenkuchen (Schwetz-gun-coo-ken) or Pflaumenkuchen (Flau-men-coo-ken). Kuchen (Coo-ken) means cake in German.
Servings Prep Time
20-30 20minutes
Cook Time
30minutes
Servings Prep Time
20-30 20minutes
Cook Time
30minutes
Ingredients
For the Topping
For the Dough
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Cut the plums in half, remove the seeds and stems, and slice into wedges.
  2. Toss the plums in sugar and cinnamon and set aside.
  3. To make the dough, start by mixing your dry ingredients, that’s the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Resist the urge to eat the sugar-coated plums.
  4. Add your butter and eggs to the dry ingredients. Using your hands, mix until incorporated. If your dough feels dry, add a tablespoon of milk until everything comes together. Knead until the dough is no longer sticky. Then roll it into a ball.
  5. Grease a baking sheet. On a clean, floured surface, using a rolling pin or a clean wine bottle, roll the dough out to the size of the baking sheet, about 1/4 of an inch thick. If you don’t have a rolling pin or wine bottle, never fear, you can simply press the dough directly into the pan with your fingers (this is my dad’s technique). If you’ve rolled your dough out, transfer it to the pan by rolling it up (see below). If it’s the right consistency it shouldn’t stick to itself and you should be able to unroll it in the pan. Remove any excess and use it to fill in the gaps in the corners, pressing the dough down into the pan till it’s full. If you have more excess, use it to make a crust around the edges. We’re not going for perfection here.
  6. Arrange the plums on top of the dough, gently pressing them in. You can arrange them however you like, crowded, sparse, in rows, in circles, in a mosaic. Do what makes you feel good. My family has always arranged them neatly in rows, so I honored tradition.
  7. Dust those babies with some more cinnamon (and sugar if you dare). Top with the sliced almonds (mine were already toasted so I added them at the end).
  8. Bake for about 30 minutes, rotating the pan halfway during cooking to ensure an even bake. When the dough is firm, the plums have softened, and the edges are brown, it’s done.
  9. Top with almonds if they were already toasted, let cool, slice into squares and serve with coffee.